Friday, September 18, 2009

Ernie Anastos: Keep Pl*cking That Chicken, And Standing Up for Our First Amendment Rights

A newscaster in New York called Ernie Anastos is in trouble, possibly, for "swearing" during a newscast on Thursday.

Anastos appears to have dropped the mother of all swear words in an off-the-cuff exchange with weatherman Nick Gregory.

"I guess it takes a tough man to make a tender forecast," Anastos said to Gregory, mimicking the old Frank Perdue commercials.

"I guess that's me," Gregory responded.

Then, as both men laughed, Anastos says, "Keep f---ing that chicken."

That is one of the funniest things I have ever heard. Below is the video (warning: "NSFW"):



The man deserves a raise.

Insiders said Anastos maintains he said plucking rather than the F-word, and that would make sense given the context of what he was saying.
"Pl*cking" is even funnier than "f*cking."

I have long maintained that people should be able to say whatever they want on television, at any time. The first amendment to the constitution of the United States reads:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

That's all it says. It doesn't say, "Unless it's something that children might be watching," or "unless it might offend someone's delicate sensibilities or superstitions." But, as I wrote back in November of '08, there are a lot of powerful people who disagree with that:

The US Supreme Court is hearing a case on whether or not the FCC can fine broadcasters over the use of "fleeting" (one time) expletives.


Easy answer: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.


Case closed, right? But do you expect a group of people who are so immature, childish, and infantile that they can't even bring themselves to utter the "dirty word" in question to actually be grown-up enough to realize this?


"Why do you think the F-word has shocking value or emphasis or force?" Roberts asked. "Because it is associated with sexual or excretory activity."


The "Roberts" mentioned in the quote above is the "Chief Justice" of the "Supreme Court". Seriously, these people should not be in a position to decide anything important, if their "chief" can talk like that. And be taken seriously, no less.


(Aside: Chief Justice Roberts believes that "the F-word" is associated with "excretory activity." From this we can safely deduce that Chief Justice Roberts must be into scat sex.)

What is offensive to you might not be offensive to me, and vice versa. Personally, I think that a newscaster falsely accusing someone of gang rape, a la Jane Velez-Mitchell on her national talk show, is far more offensive than someone dropping "the f-bomb."

Moreover, the idea of what is an "offensive," or "vulgar" word changes.

[Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts psychology professor Timothy] Jay says [cursing has been part of being human] since the advent of the vocal cord. In fact, he says the only thing that has changed over the centuries is the actual swear words themselves.

For example the s-h word - "shoot." "Shoot" used to be a swear word - "shucks," too. In the early 1900s, you weren't supposed to say "Gee" or "Jeepers." For crying out loud you couldn't even say "for crying out loud!" — it was a euphemism for Christ.

In the 1800s, the big swear words were "drat," "doggone" and - cover the kids' ears! - "Jiminy Crickets."

When early settlers came to America and stubbed their toe getting off the ship, they would have said, "Odsbodikins!" - a swear word that meant God's little body.

Did you know the word "shoot" used to be a swear word? Or "drat"? Did you know that the kid-friendly Disney company named Pinocchio's conscience after a swear word?

Originally an unnamed, minor character in Collodi's novel, he was translated in the Disney version into a comical and wise partner who accompanies Pinocchio on his adventures, having been appointed by the Blue Fairy to serve as the official conscience for Pinocchio.


What Disney had named Pinocchio's conscience "F*cky McF*cknutter"? That might have single-handedly removed the stigma from "the f-bomb."

Pinocchio and J*miny Cr*cket pic source.

1 comment:

shampoo said...

yes! let us all curse! I HATE having to watch my language! I NEED to use profanity, our forefathers probably did, too. hence, the first amendment.