Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Is Edward de Vere the true author of the works of "William Shakespeare"? Of course he is, don't be a moron, just read my amazing proof

On October 28th, a new film from the director of such masterpieces (in the Renaissance sense of that word) as "Independence Day," "The Day After Tomorrow," and "2012" (disasters all!) will open. "Anonymous" is the story of the real author of William Shakespeare's plays, Edward de Vere. Apparently, William Shakespeare was a member of the lower classes, and we all know that people who come from the lower classes are unable to create great art. An aristocrat must have done it, to thwart his political enemies. Through plays.

Here is the trailer:



I will admit, I was skeptical. I thought, "Wow, that is the stupidest thing I've heard all day, and I've been awake for almost six hours already." But after seeing this trailer, and thinking about it logically, it now makes perfect sense that William Shakespeare didn't write the plays of William Shakespeare, because he was obviously too stupid and low-born to write plays that would live on for hundreds of years after his death. After all, in addition to being a lower-class person, Mr. Shakespeare was an actor. And even though Mr. de Vere died before all of "William Shakespeare's" plays were written, and even though Mr. de Vere published poems and plays under his own name during his own lifetime, there is more than enough evidence to suggest that aristocrats didn't dare publish poems and plays under their own name, and that a person can in fact continue to write poems and plays after they die, provided that the poems and plays are compelling enough to be remembered for hundreds of years and therefore be "immortal", it seems obvious that the proof is irrefutable that "William Shakespeare" was actually Edward de Vere.

Genius capable of writing great plays and poems? Don't make me larf. This is obviously the image of a low born fool. Why is he looking off to the left, the "sinister" side in Latin? What is he trying to hide -- what is he so ashamed of? Let's follow the evidence, wherever it might lead, without fear!

But a person who has rigorous intellect such as myself is not generally satisfied with proof, no matter how compelling it might be. A person who has a rigorous intellect such as myself requires that he find evidence for himself, in order to be fully convinced. Luckily, I have found my proof, right there in one of "Mr. Shakespeare's" own "sonnets," number 145.

Why number 145? Well, because I happen to know that Mr. de Vere was the 17th Earl of Oxford. He became the 17th Earl of Oxford on August 3, 1562. 8+3+1+5+6+2=25. And (1+4)x5= 25. "25" is the smallest "aspiring number," i.e., Mr. de Vere was "aspiring" to greatness. Mr. de Vere was signaling us that sonnet number "145" was very important to him, which is why he filled it with clues as to his real identity. This is evident if you only look at the Sonnet's lines. And here they are now:
"Shakespeare's" 145th Sonnet

Those lips that Love's own hand did make
Breathed forth the sound that said 'I hate'
To me that languish'd for her sake;
But when she saw my woeful state,
Straight in her heart did mercy come,
Chiding that tongue that ever sweet
Was used in giving gentle doom,
And taught it thus anew to greet:
'I hate' she alter'd with an end,
That follow'd it as gentle day
Doth follow night, who like a fiend
From heaven to hell is flown away;
'I hate' from hate away she threw,
And saved my life, saying 'not you.'
If you've read the entire Sonnet, you probably don't need me to spell it out for you, but I will. Let's start with the final line of the Sonnet, which is the most compelling evidence of Mr. de Vere's authorship:

"And saved my life, saying 'not you.'"

This is a direct reference to Mr. Shakespeare. Mr. de Vere is saying quite plainly that Mr. Shakespeare is not the "you" who authored the works of William Shakespeare. The "life" referred to in the line is not a literal life, but a literary life. Someone saved his literary life by ascribing proper credit to Mr. de Vere, not to Mr. Shakespeare. This is not in any literal sense, but it is metaphorical -- it is to those of us who can without fear "read between the lines," and buck the established literary common knowledge and see the plain evidence that Mr. de Vere is the proper "you," and not Mr. Shakespeare.

"Not you."

But that is not the only compelling evidence within this Sonnet. Let's start now back at the beginning and prove our thesis:

Those lips that Love's own hand did make
Breathed forth the sound that said 'I hate'


Here Mr. de Vere is referring to his literary works. During Mr. de Vere's time, it was common for artists to refer to their literary creations as body parts. A story might be called a "liver," for instance. Because plays were "spoken" by "actors," plays were sometimes called "lips," i.e., "Let's go down to the Globe theater and watch that new ripping lip by that Shakespeare chap!" This is where the modern phrase "Don't give me any lip!" comes from: Stop playing around like an actor and do as I say, and don't give me any lip.

Mr. de Vere loves himself, which is why he says it was "Love's own hand did make." He's saying that he, the capitalized "Love" (which was four letters, just like "Vere"), "did make" the "lips" that everyone loves to go to the theater to watch. (By the way, this line does not refer to masturbation.) The actors "breathe forth the sound" of the words in Mr. de Vere's lips -- some of those words are "I hate," such as in that famous scene in Macbeth. The Sonnet continues:

To me that languish'd for her sake;
But when she saw my woeful state,


He's languishing because he can't take credit for his lips! ("Her sake" refers to his art, the plays, which we've already established were called "lips." "Lips" are a feminine body part, as they could refer both to the lips of the mouth, and the lips of labia, which artists of that era constantly wrote paeans to.)

His "woeful state" refers, you guessed it, to his sadness over not being able to tell everyone about his great lips. This Sonnet is a Lament.

Straight in her heart did mercy come,
Chiding that tongue that ever sweet


Here, "her heart" refers to poetry -- just as "lips" were plays, "hearts" were poems, which is why we even still today refer to poetry as "the literature of the heart." It's only in his poems, this particular poem, in fact, that Mr. de Vere can openly reveal that he is the author of William Shakespeare's plays and poems. The poem, in its turn, seems to be "chiding" the author, despite his sweetness.

Was used in giving gentle doom,
And taught it thus anew to greet:


"Gentle doom" is an oxymoron, like "mail box," and "Swiss cheese." Edward de Vere excelled in the use of oxymorons, because he was trying to disguise the fact of his authorship, i.e., "William Shakespeare/Edward de Vere." But what is Mr. de Vere greeting?

'I hate' she alter'd with an end,
That follow'd it as gentle day


Again, we see that "I hate," because Mr. de Vere is so upset over his being the real author of Mr. Shakespeare's plays. He is upset because aristocratic people can't take credit for writing great poems such as what Mr. Shakespeare wrote; only mediocre poems, such as what Mr. de Vere wrote. That "alter'd" refers to the "altered" (modern, non-poetical spelling) history of literature, in which Mr. de Vere is actually given the full credit he deserves as a genius aristocrat with the great education necessary to compose "William Shakespeare's" plays.

Also, only an aristocrat could have written plays about kings, because only aristocrats could know about kings and royalty. That seems obvious. As obvious as the sunlight on a "gentle day."

Doth follow night, who like a fiend
From heaven to hell is flown away;


"Heaven" in this case represents the full credit given to a misunderstood genius for the great work he created. "Hell" is the life of a privileged aristocrat who has to settle for merely being wealthy and powerful in his own lifetime, and have to live the death of a person who isn't acknowledged as the true author of the greatest works in English literature.

But if you don't believe, even after reading this compelling exegesis of de Vere's 145th Sonnet, that Mr. de Vere is the true author of those works heretofore ascribed to "William Shakespeare," then let me here post one of Mr. de Vere's own Sonnets, so that we might compare it to the Sonnet just exegesised:
LOVE THY CHOICE.
Who taught thee first to sigh, alas, my heart ?

Who taught thy tongue the woeful words of plaint ?

Who filled your eyes with tears of bitter smart ?

Who gave thee grief and made thy joys to faint ?

Who first did paint with colours pale thy face ?

Who first did break thy sleeps of quiet rest ?
Above the rest in court who gave thee grace ?

Who made thee strive in honour to be best ?

In constant truth to bide so firm and sure,

To scorn the world regarding but thy friends ?

With patient mind each passion to endure,

In one desire to settle to the end ?

Love then thy choice wherein such choice thou bind,
As nought but death may ever change thy mind.
First of all, the close reader of both of these works notes the similarity of the structure of the Sonnets. Both of them have thirteen lines. Both of them follow the same rhyme scheme. But let's look further.

Both of the poems contain similar words, or even the same words, such as "heart," "Love" (tellingly, capitalized in both poems!) and "woeful." Both of the poems contain metaphors. But perhaps most compelling of all is the fact that Mr. de Vere drops subtle hints of his "William Shakespeare" identity within the lines of this "Edward de Vere" poem. In the beginning of the poem, he wonders why it is that he must not take credit for the great poems of "William Shakespeare," and he can only take credit for the mediocre poems of "Edward de Vere." "Who taught thee first to sigh, alas, my heart?" he asks, in words of plaint? In other words, "Who told me I had to not take credit for all my great plays and poems?" He cries about it, and drops in lots of superfluous words to get his syllable count up, and then he hits us with the most blunt line of all:

Above the rest in court who gave thee grace ?

Here Mr. de Vere is saying that he would gladly give up his position as an aristocrat ("in court"), for the chance to accept full credit for his brilliant literary work. Except he can't, because he's an aristocrat, and it would just cause far too much scandal -- perhaps threatening the stability of England itself -- if he did so:

Who made thee strive in honour to be best ?

He strives to be the best poet and playwright in the world, and he achieved that goal, but his "honour" won't allow him to take credit for it. In the next lines, Mr. de Vere reveals that he cannot betray his friends by revealing his secret "William Shakespeare" identity, because it would "scorn the world regarding but" them. In the end, Mr. de Vere practically announces to the world in big, bold letters that he is really "William Shakespeare":

Love then thy choice wherein such choice thou bind,

As nought but death may ever change thy mind.


Only in death can Mr. de Vere receive the credit he so richly deserves. And, even though he hates to do it, he has made his "choice," and his choice has "bound" him to a hateful untruth with which he must live, his only comfort coming from the fact that he is a wealthy aristocrat with a privileged life. He must pin his hopes on a few visionary scholars willing to remove the blinders of "facts" and look at the compelling "evidence" to read between the lines to carry forward the secret knowledge that it was Edward de Vere, and not William Shakespeare, who wrote the plays and poems of "William Shakespeare." And if I still haven't convinced you, after this fantastically fascinating post that dares to reveal the true truth, then you can look elsewhere for more on this amazing reality.

In this painting, Edward de Vere is depicted looking to his right, also known as "The Shakespeare side" in theater circles. You can tell just by looking at him that he's a genius. Note also that he has a frilly thing around his neck, just like "William Shakespeare."




2 comments:

midsummermuse said...

HAHAHAHAHAHA! Loved your post, can't believe that piece of poop of a movie.

william s said...

You mean each sonnet has fourteen lines surely? And sonnet 145 is in tetrameter and not pentameter like Oxford. Sorry I mean both are by Orksford.