Sunday, July 30, 2017

What is wrong with Twin Peaks? The revival is going disastrously, sadly wrong.

Actually, it’s not a total disaster. There’s plenty to like about it. There was a lot of fun to be had watching Cooper escape the Black Lodge, for example. The scene in which we meet Wally Brando was inspired. I liked the scene in which the new Sheriff Truman’s wife ranted about the leak, and the bucket. I liked the glass box in the first few episodes, but I don’t like what they’ve done with the glass box since (basically nothing, except to show an image of Bob Cooper inside it, or something). There were images in the “atomic bomb” sequence that were full of creative energy and life. Matthew Lillard’s Ray Wise-inspired performance as the highly emotional “zone” visitor and accused murderer William Hastings was very good. I always like seeing Jane Adams in anything, and she’s been very good here, but outside of revealing that she performs comedy on open mic nights her character, coroner Constance Talbot, hasn’t had all that much to do.

What does it say about the Twin Peaks revival that the Wally Brando scene has been the best moment so far?

The show is also making some very bad narrative decisions. While the pace is turgid, the storyline is unfocused and undisciplined. It focuses on exactly the wrong or the least interesting aspects of what’s going on—then glosses over the truly interesting stuff. For instance, two episodes ago we learned that Hastings had a BLOG in which he was BLOGGING for crying out loud about ACTUALLY VISITING THE  BLACK LODGE (which he called “the zone” and meeting Major Briggs [“the Major”]). And we learn about this from basically a throw-away line from Albert, who’s reading a report on the discovery of Major Briggs’s decapitated body. Then Agent Tammy Preston talks to him and he tells, not shows, about visiting the Black Lodge, describing meeting the Major in a scene that’s so beautiful and scary—yet we only get his reaction to it, not the scene itself. Lillard breaks down admirably, Leland Palmer-style, but the viewer is still left with the feeling that… we should be seeing this, not hearing about it.

The problem with that lack of narrative focus was compounded by last week’s episode’s visit to the spot where Hastings et al visited “the zone.” Agents Cole, Albert, Preston, and Diane (why oh why did Diane have to turn out to be a real person and not just the name of Cooper’s personal tape recorder???) and Detective Dave Macklay bring Hastings to a run-down, skeevy looking area with dilapidated buildings, dust, and weeds— a perfect spot for Lynch creepiness. Hastings points to the building and Albert and Gordon walk up to it. Then Gordon has a vision.

Wat?

Why would anyone, even Gordon Cole, be able to just walk up to that building and see the Woodsmen standing on a staircase like that? Could anyone just walk up to that spot and see Woodsmen? There’s not much sense that this other place, if it is the Black Lodge, is anything particularly special.

Then a Woodsman sneaks into Macklay’s car and explodes Hastings’ head. Which prompts some dry humor from Lynch, as his Gordon deadpans, “He’s dead.” The scene doesn’t have nearly the impact it should—there’s very little sense of menace—because the viewer never gets the sense that this is grounded in anything other than a desire to explain stuff.

And speaking of explaining stuff… How about that note from Major Briggs? The show was essentially twiddling its thumbs and decided, “Well, things have to move forward now…” and so came up with the note telling the Sheriff, Hawk, and Bobby to go visit a certain place at a certain time. And then Hawk had a scroll (at least Lynch and his co-writer, Mark Frost) had enough cheek to have Hawk say something about the scroll never changing but always being current—it’s what the Native Americans call a Factitious Scroll) revealing that when they go to that place there’s going to be BLACK FIRE for crying out loud. So we have that to look forward to while we…

…Watch Stupor Cooper stumble around and repeat the last few words he’s heard. Over and over. Eventually it’s going to become what? Endearing? Funny?

Stupor Cooper is an annoyance on many levels. In my previous Twin Peaks post, I hoped that Stupor Cooper wouldn’t win the show. So far, unfortunately, he has. This has gone on way too long. First of all, what casino just gives someone over $400K (in cash!) without taking some kind of information from them? Wouldn’t they put the winner’s name and face all over, to help drum up business?

Still not funny.

Beyond that—if you knew someone who was stumbling around in a stupor, who was barely verbal, would you wait three or four days to take them to the hospital, the way Dougie’s wife did? Let’s leave all that stuff aside. Let’s even leave aside the fact that the Stupor Cooper joke has completely worn out (David Lynch’s sense of humor often tends toward “dad jokes” and very dry, deadpan stuff, so I can see why this appealed to him and I can even see having Stupor Cooper for maybe two or three episodes). What really hurts about this is, this is probably the last Twin Peaks we’re going to get, ever.

We’ve gone since 1992 without seeing Cooper. Cooper has been trapped in the Black Lodge for 25 years. And now that he’s back, he’s in a complete stupor?

I want Agent Dale Cooper. I didn’t subscribe to Showtime (seriously, I added Showtime to my Amazon Prime for one reason and one reason only, and it wasn’t so I could watch that documentary about how the Tim Burton-Nicolas Cage Superman movie didn’t get made) to watch my beloved Agent Cooper stumbling around like a moron for—however many episodes it’s been.

And Bob Cooper’s even worse.

Bob was a deeply disturbing creation. Maybe the scariest character ever to appear on network television. Do you remember when Sarah Palmer had that vision of Bob in the second episode of the original series? Damn that was scary. Unfortunately the actor who portrayed Bob has passed away, and the revival has done some interesting and occasionally inspired things to bring him into the storyline.

Now THIS was a scary moment.

But what the show really needed to do was to give us a truly disturbing antagonist. Someone or something that could measure up to Bob. They’ve tried with the Woodsmen, and it hasn’t worked for me. But that would be okay if there was a single force that made us feel like there were actually high stakes involved. A character that you would not, under any circumstances, want to see out of the corner of your eye. I think that’s what they tried to do with Bob Cooper.

They gave the evil Cooper long stringy hair and dressed him vaguely like Bob, but so far it hasn’t come across (they also, at one point when Bob Cooper was in prison, had his mirror image twist slightly so that it became Bob-ish). He can apparently cause sirens to go off in a prison by dialing a few numbers on a phone. He’s got the protection of the Woodsmen, who saved his life after Ray shot him. But none of what we’ve seen captures the sense of dread that the original Bob inspired. This Bob Cooper just seems so uninspired. Even the scene in which he killed Darya felt mundane. It could have appeared in an episode of "Arrow."

When the original Twin Peaks series began the viewers became invested in the proceedings in part because there was a sense that the creators were discovering all this stuff along with us. There was a real sense of wonder to the show. The pace, roughly one day per episode, was such that we had time to process everything that was happening in Twin Peaks. And there was a sense that this was an odd little town with a lot of secrets, most of which were fairly routine (extramarital affairs), tawdry (prostitution, drug-running) and then, eventually… really horrible (incest, child prostitution). Meanwhile we were also learning that there were actual supernatural forces at work, on top of everything else. It’s incredible that they were able to strike a balance so that everything worked together so elegantly.

I cared as much about Pete Martell, Hawk, and Major Briggs as about Agent Cooper and “The Little Man from Another Place” who later came to be known as the Arm. This time around there are no new characters to take their place (do you care about Bobby’s and Shelly’s daughter? How about Beverly?


My friend Michael has suggested that this new revival feels like a fan film to him, and I think that’s an accurate way of looking at it. Lynch and Frost are coming across like a pair of very enthusiastic fans who absorbed all of the events memorized all the characters and their back stories, kept copious notes when Windom Earle told Rusty about the White Lodge and Black Lodge—but did not absorb any of the emotion and heart of the show. This story isn’t doing anything to advance the world of Twin Peaks. It’s so bogged down in trying to explain the mythology (even to the extent that it might have actually presented an “origin” of Bob) that, for all its creativity, it feels hollow and lifeless. There’s nothing here to build on for a potential future series or film or book. It feels like it was put together by a team of Stupor Coopers, just repeating the last few words they heard, over and over again, trying to show what’s going on but in the process forgetting everything that made the original so special in the first place.

Where is Invitation to Love??